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RASPBERRY PI 4 – OS VERSION

Quick, simple trick to see the Version of the Operating system that you are using

Open a terminal
from a terminal, type:
cat /etc/os-release

It will return something like this
NAME=”Ubuntu”
VERSION=”21.04 (Hirsute Hippo)”
ID=ubuntu
ID_LIKE=debian
PRETTY_NAME=”Ubuntu 21.04″
VERSION_ID=”21.04″
HOME_URL=”https://www.ubuntu.com/”
SUPPORT_URL=”https://help.ubuntu.com/”
BUG_REPORT_URL=”https://bugs.launchpad.net/ubuntu/”
PRIVACY_POLICY_URL=”https://www.ubuntu.com/legal/terms-and-policies/privacy-policy”
VERSION_CODENAME=hirsute
UBUNTU_CODENAME=hirsute

As you can see, my version is Ubuntu 21.04

SCRAPING YAHOO FINANCE FOR ALL STOCK DATA

I found a great little snippet of code over on Kaggle,


and needed to build a system to run it from
https://tacticalware.com/jupyter-installation-on-a-headless-raspberry-pi-4-running-ubuntu-20-10/

Once you build the system as I did in my guide above you will need to do one other thing to get it to run
Open Putty
SSH to your Jupyter Pi
Login
Type:
sudo bash
pip instal yfinance

Now on another computer you can open your Jupyter notebook at
http://Jupyter:8888

Then go back to


Click File
Click Download
It will give you a file with the extension of ipynb

You can then go back to your Jupyter notebook and upload it

Once you upload it, run the notebook and it should scrape about 2.5GB of data, direct for your viewing pleasure

Hardware that I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4


JUPYTER INSTALLATION ON A HEADLESS RASPBERRY PI 4 RUNNING UBUNTU 20.10

More and More, I am finding my way to Jupyter Notebooks. And guides online are scarce to come by, especially when you are running it on a Raspberry Pi 4. Below is a mixture of a few guides that I had found, and this is what worked for me.

For my setup I am running a Raspberry Pi 4 from a NVME M.2 Drive connected via USB 3.0. I am NOT using the slow micro SD card. To have the same setup as me, follow this guide:
https://tacticalware.com/boot-raspberry-pi-4-from-m-2-usb-drive/

After your Pi recognizes the M.2 NVME Drive, I then use Raspberry Pi Imager to write Ubuntu Server 20.10 to the USB Drive. Then I plug it into the Pi, to get ready for the steps below

Now boot your Raspberry Pi 4 and Login
Then
sudo bash
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get install net-tools
sudo hostnamectl set-hostname Jupyter
reboot
sudo bash
sudo rm /usr/bin/python
sudo ln -s /usr/bin/python3 /usr/bin/python
sudo apt-get install python3-pip
sudo pip3 install –upgrade pip
sudo apt-get install npm
sudo npm install -g configurable-http-proxy
sudo -H pip3 install notebook jupyterhub
jupyterhub –generate-config
sudo mv jupyterhub_config.py /root
nano /root/jupyterhub_config.py
ctrl +w
http://:8000

change to http://:8888
uncomment and delete space on this line c.JupyterHub.bind_url = ‘http://:8888’
ctrl +x
y
jupyterhub -f /root/jupyterhub_config.py

nano /lib/systemd/system/jupyterhub.service
[Unit]
Description=JupyterHub Service
After=multi-user.target

[Service]
User=root
ExecStart=/usr/local/bin/jupyterhub –config=/root/jupyterhub_config.py
Restart=on-failure

[Install]
WantedBy=multi-user.target

ctrl + x to exit
y to save

sudo systemctl daemon-reload
sudo systemctl start jupyterhub
sudo systemctl enable jupyterhub
sudo systemctl status jupyterhub.service

on a different computer
open an internet browser
http://Jupyter:8888
login as any user

Back on the Raspberry Pi
sudo -H pip3 install testresources
sudo -H pip3 install jupyterlab
jupyter serverextension enable –py jupyterlab –system
nano /root/jupyterhub_config.py
uncomment and modicy the c.Spawner.default line to reflect the following:
c.Spawner.default_url = ‘/lab’
ctrl + x
to exit
y to save
sudo apt-get install libatlas-base-dev
y
sudo -H pip3 install numpy
pip3 install seaborn
pip install Cython numpy
pip install cmake

sudo addgroup jupyter_admin
sudo adduser tacticalware
sudo usermod -aG jupyter_admin tacticalware
nano /root/jupyterhub_config.py

ctrl +x to exit
y
to save
Add this to the end of the file
c.PAMAuthenticator.admin_groups = {‘jupyter_admin’}
ctrl + x to exit

You are now finished. On the other computer
Open an internet browser
http://Jupyter:8888
And play!

Hardware that I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

INSTALL MONGODB ON RASPBERRY PI 4

By far the best guide I have found, in starting this journey, was written by Mark Smith on https://developer.mongodb.com/how-to/mongodb-on-raspberry-pi/

If you want to see why things work the way they do, please visit his guide. My guide below is just the commands, and how I am connecting into the database once it is setup.

To begin, first you will want to install Ubuntu Server 20.10 as described here:
https://tacticalware.com/install-ubuntu-server-20-10-64-bit-on-raspberry-pi-4-using-a-m-2-drive/

Once you are up and running, ssh into the Raspberry Pi
Login

From the terminal run the following:
sudo bash

wget -qO – https://www.mongodb.org/static/pgp/server-4.4.asc | sudo apt-key add –

echo “deb [ arch=amd64,arm64 ] https://repo.mongodb.org/apt/ubuntu focal/mongodb-org/4.4 multiverse” | tee /etc/apt/sources.list.d/mongodb-org-4.4.list

apt-get update

apt-get install -y mongodb-org

systemctl daemon-reload

systemctl enable mongod

systemctl start mongod

systemctl status mongod

CTRL button +c to exit

mongo
use admin

db.createUser( { user: "admin",
 
        pwd: "SuperSecretPassword",

        roles: [ "userAdminAnyDatabase",

                 "dbAdminAnyDatabase",

                 "readWriteAnyDatabase"] } )

exit

nano /etc/mongod.conf

Add these lines to the end of the file

security:

   authorization: enabled

CTRL +x to Exit
Y to Save

systemctl restart mongod

mongo

db.adminCommand({listDatabases: 1})

Make sure you had no errors

exit

mongo -u “admin” -p

Enter your admin password for mongo, aks your SuperSecretPassword

Type
db.adminCommand({listDatabases: 1})
This will list out your databases and ensure you created it properly

exit

nano /etc/mongod.conf
and Change the bind ip from 127.0.0.1 to 0.0.0.0

net:
   port: 27017
   bindIp: 0.0.0.0

CTRL +x to Exit
Y to Save

systemctl restart mongod

ufw allow 27017/tcp

MongoDB is now successfully setup and running. On to configuring the Windows 10 system

To connect to the MongoDB from a Windows 10 computer

Open an Internet Browser on your Windows 10 computer
Navigate to https://robomongo.org/
Download the Robomongo Robo 3T Client
Once you install it, add these settings to connect to your system
Click Create
Connection Tab
Type – Direct Connection
Address – The IP of your Raspberry Pi
Port 27017
Authentication Tab
Check mark Perform Authentication
Database is admin
User Name is admin
Password is your SuperSecretPassword
Auth is SCRAM
Click Save
Click Connect

You are now connected and ready to run with your MongoDB environment

Hardware that I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

INSTALL UBUNTU SERVER 20.10 64-Bit ON RASPBERRY PI 4 USING A M.2 Drive

This guide shows you how to install an Operating System on a Raspberry Pi 4. The one I chose for this guide is Ubuntu Server 20.10 64 bit, so if you are installing that, you can follow along easily. If you are wondering which hardware I used, the exact items are linked at the bottom

On a Windows computer
Insert your USB M.2 Drive into the USB 3.0 Port on your Windows computer
Open a web browser
Navigate to https://www.raspberrypi.org/software/
Download the Raspberry Pi Imager

Once it is downloaded, double click the imager.exe file
Select Yes
Click Install
Checkmark Run Raspberry Pi Imager
Click Finish

Now that the Raspberry Pi Imager is running
Click Choose OS
Scroll down and select Ubuntu
Then select Ubuntu Server 20.10 (RPI 3/4/400) 64-BIT
Select your SD Card (500GB WD M.2 Drive)
Click Write
All existing data …. will be erased. Are you sure you want to continue?
Click Yes
Data is written to the SD Card
The data is automatically verified after it is written
Once it finishes you will see the message that “you can now remove the SD card from the reader”
Remove the card
Click Continue

Now back on the Raspberry Pi
Plug in network cable
Connect the keyboard
Plug in a mouse
Connect the HDMI cable
Install the M.2 USB Drive you just made (up above)
Plug in the power (Last step)

Boot up your Raspberry Pi
The first time you login the username is ubuntu
The password is ubuntu
You will be forced to change the password immediately
Now you will want to run the following commands
sudo bash
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade
y
apt install net tools
ifconfig

Note your ip address

You can now connect remotely and finish setting up the system

You are done. Your Raspberry Pi 4 is setup with the Ubuntu Server 20.10

Hardware that I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

Thanks for reading…….

RASPBERRY PI 4 – FLIGHTAWARE SETUP

Flightaware…an amazing app, will give you a free subscription if you monitor the skies above your house. To setup a raspberry pi with this ability, perform the following

This guide assumes you have a Raspberry Pi, already setup with Raspbian. If you don’t have this, follow the guide below:
https://tacticalware.com/install-raspbian-os-on-raspberry-pi-4/

Once you are up and running with your Raspberry Pi, you will need to plug in your flightaware usb dongle which can be found on the bottom of this page

After that, run the following commands:
From your Raspberry Pi “Desktop”
Open a terminal
sudo bash
apt-get update
apt dist-upgrade
reboot

Your system will now reboot and come back up to your “Desktop”
Open a terminal
sudo bash
wget http://flightaware.com/adsb/piaware/files/packages/pool/piaware/p/piaware-support/piaware-repository_3.7.1_all.deb
dpkg -i piaware-repository_3.7.1.deb
apt-get update
apt-get install piaware
piaware-config allow-auto-updates yes
apt-get install dump1090-fa
reboot


Your system will now reboot and come back up to your “Desktop”
Open a terminal
sudo bash
ifconfig
get the ip address of your Pi
Open the Chromium web browser on your Raspberry Pi
Navigate to https://flightaware.com/adsb/piaware/claim
Create an account or Login and claim your piaware.
If successful you will see a message similar to the following message on the web page:
PiAware – Claim and Link a Brand New PiAware Ground Station
Success!
You claimed the following 1 receivers:
162323d5-6532-4s436-9486-d6173334

Next you will want to click on the link listed in your Success message:
Great news! Your account is associated with the following PiAware receivers and you can view your statistics here:
Now you will be in the config page of your flightaware account
So you will want to click on the Gear icon
Configure your location and the height of the antenna

And you are done!

You are now monitoring the sky overhead

Hardware I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

SanDisk MobileMate USB 3.0 microSD Card Reader (Only needed if you dont have a Micro SD Reader/Writer slot in your computer)
https://amzn.to/39toi0G

Flightaware USB Stick
https://amzn.to/3aFKpju

Flightaware Antenna
https://amzn.to/3pZ3yn3

RASPBERRY PI RDP TO WINDOWS 10

From time to time I need the ability to use RDP from my Raspberry Pi, to connect to my Windows 10 computer. Here is how I have installed RDP on my Raspberry Pi.

First you need to make sure your Raspberry Pi is running on Raspbian

Next, open a Terminal
Type:
sudo bash
apt-get update
apt-get dist-upgrade
apt-get install xrdp remmina
Press Y when prompted
The software will install
Once it has completed, reboot your Raspberry Pi

When you are back onto your Desktop
Go to the Raspberry Menu in the top left
Select Internet
Click Remmina

Now put the settings of your Windows 10 computer in, and make sure your Windows 10 system already has RDP enabled

Connect, and you are in!

Hardware that I used:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

SIMPLIFY3D SETTINGS FOR A DIRECT DRIVE ENDER 3 PRO USING eSUN’S PETG IN BLACK

I am in the process of putting together several posts, which detail my printer hardware, along with giving you a copy of my FFF profile for that setup. For this post I am using Simplify3D to Slice eSUN’s PETG in Black, on a Creality Ender 3 Pro with a Direct Drive setup, using a Micro Swiss Hotend.

Slicer Profile can be downloaded here:
https://tacticalware.com/downloads/Tacticalware_Direct_Drive_Ender_3_Pro_ESUN_Black_PETG.fff

Hardware that I used:
Ender 3 Pro
https://amzn.to/3qZQTks

Direct Drive
https://amzn.to/2IR0usR

Hotend
https://amzn.to/37iIrVW

Tubing
https://amzn.to/2IQ8V7N

eSun PETG
https://amzn.to/34fRxke

And I have the following gear in place running Octoprint:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

The most important thing is after you setup your system, you will need to dial it in. For that, you can refer to these pages:
Configure your Extrusion Multiplier:
https://tacticalware.com/ender-3-pro-simplify3d-configuring-the-extrusion-multiplier/

Confirm your heat settings:
https://tacticalware.com/3d-printing-heat-tower/

Thanks for reading!

SIMPLIFY3D SETTINGS FOR A DIRECT DRIVE ENDER 3 PRO USING HATCHBOX’S PETG IN BLACK

I am in the process of putting together several posts, which detail my printer hardware, along with giving you a copy of my FFF profile for that setup. For this post I am using Simplify3D to Slice Hatchbox’s PETG in Black, on a Creality Ender 3 Pro with a Direct Drive setup, using a Micro Swiss Hotend.

Slicer Profile can be downloaded here:
https://tacticalware.com/downloads/Tacticalware_Direct_Drive_Ender_3_Pro_HATCHBOX_Black_PETG.fff

Hardware that I used:
Ender 3 Pro
https://amzn.to/3qZQTks

Direct Drive
https://amzn.to/2IR0usR

Hotend
https://amzn.to/37iIrVW

Tubing
https://amzn.to/2IQ8V7N

Hatchbox PETG
https://amzn.to/385qWHQ

And I have the following gear in place running Octoprint:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

The most important thing is after you setup your system, you will need to dial it in. For that, you can refer to these pages:
Configure your Extrusion Multiplier:
https://tacticalware.com/ender-3-pro-simplify3d-configuring-the-extrusion-multiplier/

Confirm your heat settings:
https://tacticalware.com/3d-printing-heat-tower/



Thanks for reading!

SIMPLIFY3D SETTINGS FOR A DIRECT DRIVE ENDER 3 PRO USING SainSmart’s TPU

I am in the process of putting together several posts, which detail my printer hardware, along with giving you a copy of my FFF profile for that setup. For this post I am using Simplify3D to Slice SainSmart’s TPU, on a Creality Ender 3 Pro with a Direct Drive setup, using a Micro Swiss Hotend.

Slicer Profile can be downloaded here:
https://tacticalware.com/downloads/Tacticalware_Direct_Drive_Ender_3_Pro_SainSmart_TPU_Red.fff

Hardware that I used:
Ender 3 Pro
https://amzn.to/3qZQTks

Direct Drive
https://amzn.to/2IR0usR

Hotend
https://amzn.to/37iIrVW

Tubing
https://amzn.to/2IQ8V7N

SainSmart Red TPU
https://amzn.to/3mmCOdB

And I have the following gear in place running Octoprint:
Raspberry Pi 4 (4gb)
https://amzn.to/3q551IO

SanDisk 32GB Ultra microSDHC UHS-I Memory Card with Adapter
https://amzn.to/2Vfvo0y

CanaKit 3.5A Raspberry Pi 4 Power Supply (USB-C)
https://amzn.to/3fNTYPu

CanaKit Raspberry Pi 4 Micro HDMI Cable – 6 Feet
https://amzn.to/33u5hr9

Western Digital 500GB WD_Black SN750 NVMe
https://amzn.to/3nZ5pH4

Plugable USB C to M.2 NVMe Tool-free Enclosure
https://amzn.to/3lflV3L

The most important thing is after you setup your system, you will need to dial it in. For that, you can refer to these pages:
Configure your Extrusion Multiplier:
https://tacticalware.com/ender-3-pro-simplify3d-configuring-the-extrusion-multiplier/

Confirm your heat settings:
https://tacticalware.com/3d-printing-heat-tower/

Thanks for reading!